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NCI Thesaurus
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The NCI Term Browser provides access to the terminology sources listed below, some of which are proprietary and included, by permission, for non-commercial use only.

  • ICD-10 & ICD-O-3: The World Health Organization allows use of ICD-10 and ICD-O-3 in NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services, but requires licensing for other purposes (see http://www.who.int/classifications/icd/en/ ).
  • MedDRA: The Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) terminology is licensed for NCI work and may be viewed on NCI browsers. All other uses are prohibited, unless covered by separate subscription to MedDRA from the MedDRA MSSO (see http://www.meddramsso.com ) or contact at http://mssohelp@ngc.com , 877.258.8280, or 12011 Sunset Hills Road Reston Virginia, 20190-3285.
  • NCIm is built using the National Library of Medicine's UMLS Metathesaurus, use of which is restricted under the UMLS license agreement (see http://www.nlm.nih.gov/research/umls/license.html ).
  • SNOMED CT: The International Health Terminology Standards Development Organisation (IHTSDO) allows use of SNOMED CT in NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services, but requires licensing for other purposes. Terms of use for SNOMED CT are contained in Appendix 2, SNOMED CT Affiliate Licence Agreement , of the License for Use of the UMLS Metathesaurus.
  • UMLS Semantic Network: The National Library of Medicine makes the UMLS Semantic Network freely available without charge on request, subject to the conditions specified at http://semanticnetwork.nlm.nih.gov/TermsAndConditions/ .

Source   Description
ChEBI (version: v151)   Chemical Entities of Biological Interest (ChEBI) is provided by the European Bioinformatics Institute, which is part of the European Molecular Biology Laboratory, located on the Wellcome Trust Genome Campus in Hinxton, UK. ChEBI is a freely available dictionary of molecular entities focused on 'small' chemical compounds and also specifies the relationships between molecular entities or classes of entities. The term 'molecular entity' refers to any constitutionally or isotopically distinct atom, molecule, ion, ion pair, radical, radical ion, complex, conformer, etc., identifiable as a separately distinguishable entity. The molecular entities represented are either natural or synthetic products that are used to intervene in the processes of living organisms. Most molecules directly encoded by the genome (e.g. nucleic acids, proteins and cleavage-derived peptides) are not included in ChEBI. Data is incorporated from several sources and subjected to merging procedures to eliminate redundancy. The main data sources are IntEnz, KEGG COMPOUND, PDBeChem, and ChEMBL. Data from several other sources are manually entered into the database by a ChEBI curator. (Text adapted from EBI Welcome Page and ChEBI Home.)
CTCAE (version: 4.03)   Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) is widely accepted throughout the oncology community as the standard classification and severity grading scale for adverse events in cancer therapy clinical trials and other oncology settings. Version 4, released in May 2009, is a major update based on extensive international participation by stakeholders and experts. It is harmonized with MedDRA at the Adverse Event (AE) level, includes revised AE terms and severity indicators to reflect clinical effects identified with current oncology interventions, and is a caBIG vocabulary standard. CTCAE is designed to integrate into information networks for safety data exchange, and is expected to have a significant impact in data management for AE data collection, analysis, and patient outcomes associated with cancer research and care.
GO (version: May2017)   Gene Ontology (GO) is a collaborative effort with the aim of standardizing the representation of gene and gene product attributes across species and databases. GO covers three main subject areas: molecular function, biological process, and cellular component. GO does not name genes or gene products, nor does it attempt to provide structured terminology beyond its three domains.
GO to NCIt Mapping (version: 1.1)   This is a manual EVS mapping of concepts with equivalent meaning in the source and target terminology versions shown below:

   Source: GO (Gene Ontology) April2014
   Target: NCIt (NCI Thesaurus) 14.04d

The browser links each mapped concept to that concept's page in the current production version of its terminology.

The first GO to NCIt mapping was manually curated by editors working at NCI in 2009. Automated term matching was performed to create a preliminary map of the content in the Biological Process branch of NCIt and the GO biological_process branch. The preliminary map was reviewed and validated by editors working at NCI to ensure that terms with the same definitions were mapped. The map is updated when changes to the GO content invalidate current mapped entries.

The Version shows the month and year that the mapping data were extracted. The Release Date shows the day that this mapping was approved for publication.
HGNC (version: May2017)   The Human Genome Organisation's (HUGO) Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC) at the European Bioinformatics Institute approves a gene name and symbol (short-form abbreviation) for each known human gene. All approved symbols are stored in the HGNC database. Each symbol is unique and each gene is only given one approved gene symbol. This facilitates electronic data exchange and retrieval. In preference each symbol maintains parallel construction in different members of a gene family and can also be used in other species, especially the mouse. HGNC has already approved over 33,000 symbols; the vast majority of these are for protein-coding genes, but also include symbols for pseudogenes, non-coding RNAs, phenotypes and genomic features. HGNC assigns nomenclature to genes submitted by the Human Genome Project, as well as by scientists, journals (e.g. Genomics, Nature Genetics), databases (e.g. Ensembl, Entrez Gene, MGD, RGD and OMIM), and researchers working on gene families, chromosome segments or whole chromosomes. In all cases, considerable efforts are made to use a symbol acceptable to workers in the field. See http://www.genenames.org for details.
HL7 (version: V3 R2.36)   HL7 Reference Information Model (HL7 RIM) is the cornerstone of the Health Level 7 (HL7) Version 3 development process. An object model created as part of the Version 3 methodology, the RIM is a large, structured representation of the HL7 clinical data domains and identifies the life cycle that a message or groups of related messages will carry. It is a shared model between all domains and, as such, is the model from which all domains create their messages. The RIM is an ANSI approved standard.
ICD-10-CM (version: 2016)   The International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-10-CM) is based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision (ICD-10). ICD-10-CM will be used to code and classify morbidity data from inpatient and outpatient records, physician offices, and most National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) surveys. ICD-10-CM is scheduled to be the official system of assigning codes to diagnoses and procedures associated with hospital utilization in the United States.

ICD-10-CM provides coded hierarchical classifications for:
  • diseases and injuries;
  • surgical, diagnostic, and therapeutic procedures;
  • supplementary classification of external causes of injury and poisoning; and
  • supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services.
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are the U.S. governmental agencies responsible for overseeing all changes and modifications to ICD-10-CM.
ICD-10 (version: 2010)   Used to classify diseases and other health problems recorded on many types of health and vital records including death certificates and health records. In addition to enabling the storage and retrieval of diagnostic information for clinical, epidemiological and quality purposes, these records also provide the basis for the compilation of national mortality and morbidity statistics by WHO Member States. ICD-10 was endorsed by the Forty-third World Health Assembly in May 1990 and has been in use in WHO Member States since 1994.
ICD-9-CM (version: 2014)   The International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) is based on the World Health Organization's International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision (ICD-9). ICD-9-CM is used to code and classify morbidity data from inpatient and outpatient records, physician offices, and most National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) surveys. ICD-9-CM is the official system of assigning codes to diagnoses and procedures associated with hospital utilization in the United States.

ICD-9-CM provides coded hierarchical classifications for:
  • diseases and injuries;
  • surgical, diagnostic, and therapeutic procedures;
  • supplementary classification of external causes of injury and poisoning; and
  • supplementary classification of factors influencing health status and contact with health services.
The National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) are the U.S. governmental agencies responsible for overseeing all changes and modifications to ICD-9-CM.
LOINC (version: 254)   Logical Observation Identifier Names and Codes (LOINC®) facilitates the exchange and pooling of clinical results for clinical care, outcomes management, and research by providing a set of universal codes and names to identify laboratory and other clinical observations. The Regenstrief Institute, Inc, an internationally renowned healthcare and informatics research organization, maintains the LOINC database and supporting documentation, and the RELMA mapping program.
MA (version: July2016)   The Adult Mouse Anatomy (MA) ontology provides standardized nomenclature for anatomical entities in the postnatal mouse. Structured as a directed acyclic graph with 'is a' and 'part of' relationships, the MA organizes anatomical terms hierarchically from both spatial and anatomical systems perspectives. MA terms and identifiers are being used to annotate and integrate different types of data pertinent to mouse anatomy such as gene expression patterns, biological processes, and information about phenotypes and pathologies. The MA was developed and is being maintained and expanded as part of the Gene Expression Database (GXD) project (GXD Project Page) MA Ontology Browser: MA Ontology Browser
MA to NCIt Mapping (version: 1.0)   This is a manual EVS mapping of concepts with equivalent meaning in the source and target terminology versions shown below:

    Source: MA (Anatomical Dictionary for the Adult Mouse) July2011
    Target: NCIt (NCI Thesaurus) 11.09d

The browser links each mapped concept to that concept's page in the current production version of its terminology.

As part of the caBIG-funded Mouse-Human Anatomy Project (MHAP), the Adult Mouse Anatomy (MA) ontology and the set of anatomy concepts contained in the NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) were compared and harmonized. Matches between mouse and human anatomy terms were identified and validated, resulting in a highly curated set of mappings between the two ontologies. As both anatomical ontologies are being used to annotate different types of research data for mouse and human, respectively, cross-mappings between the two ontologies will facilitate the integration of mouse and human data, and the translation of basic research discoveries into clinical settings.
MedDRA (version: 19.1)   Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities Terminology (MedDRA) is an international standard terminology used to classify adverse event information associated with the use of biopharmaceuticals and other medical products. MedDRA was developed under the auspices of the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use (ICH). The International Federation of Pharmaceutical Manufacturers and Associations (IFPMA) owns MedDRA as trustee for ICH, and the Maintenance and Support Services Organization (MSSO) serves as the repository, maintainer, and distributor.
MGED Ontology (version: 1.3.1)   Warning: The MGED Ontology is deprecated and its concepts subsumed into the Ontology for Biomedical Investigation (OBI). Users are encouraged to migrate to OBI for updated content.
MGED Ontology contains concepts, definitions, terms, and resources for standardized description of a microarray experiment in support of MAGE v.1. The MGED ontology is divided into the MGED Core ontology, intended to be stable and in synch with MAGE v.1, and the MGED Extended ontology, which adds further associations and classes not found in MAGE v.1.
NCIt to ChEBI Mapping (version: 1.0)   This is a manual EVS mapping of concepts with equivalent meaning in the source and target terminology versions shown below:

   Source: NCIt (NCI Thesaurus) 16.10e
   Target: CHEBI (Chemical Entities of Biological Interest) v144

The browser links each mapped concept to that concept's page in the current production version of its terminology.

The first NCIt to CHEBI mapping was manually curated by editors working at NCI in November of 2011. Automated term matching was performed to create a preliminary map of all of the content in NCIt with all of the content in CHEBI. The preliminary map was reviewed and validated by editors working at NCI to ensure accuracy. Minor updates occur when new chemical concepts published in NCIt are mapped to CHEBI concepts, and when changes in the CHEBI content invalidate current mapped entries. Major updates, which involve the manual review of all of the unmapped content in NCIt against all of the unmapped content in CHEBI, may occur approximately once every 2 or 3 years.

The Version shows the month and year that the mapping data were extracted. The Release Date shows the day that this mapping was approved for publication.
NCIt to HGNC Mapping (version: 1.0)   This is a manual EVS mapping of concepts with equivalent meaning in the source and target terminology versions shown below:

   Source: NCIt (NCI Thesaurus) 17.05e
   Target: HGNC (HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee) May2017

The browser links each mapped concept to that concept's page in the current production version of its terminology.

The first NCIt to HGNC mapping was manually curated by editors working at NCI in March of 2012. Automated term matching was performed to create a preliminary mapping from the Gene branch of NCIt to the Approved Symbols in HGNC. The preliminary map was reviewed by editors at NCI to map the HGNC to the wild-type (wt) allele concepts in NCIt. In November 2016, the map was revised to better reflect the nature of both HGNC and NCIt concepts by mapping the HGNC codes to the NCIt parent gene concepts. When new gene concepts are published in NCIt, they are mapped to the appropriate HGNC concept, the mapping data file is updated, and the new mapping relationships are published

The Version shows the month and year that the mapping data were extracted. The Release Date shows the day that this mapping was approved for publication.
NCI Metathesaurus (version: 201610)   NCI Metathesaurus (NCIm) is a wide-ranging biomedical terminology database that covers most terminologies used by NCI for clinical care, translational and basic research, and public information and administrative activities.

NCIm features:
  • Maps 6,400,000 terms from more than 75 sources into 2,700,000 biomedical concepts that represent their meaning.
  • Displays preferred terms, synonyms, definitions, and other information from each source.
  • Links to NCI Thesaurus and other related information sources.
  • More than 30,000,000 cross-links between content elements.
  • Updated frequently by a team of biomedical terminology and subject matter experts.
NCIm contains most public domain terminologies from the National Library of Medicine's UMLS Metathesaurus, as well as many other biomedical terminologies created by or of interest to NCI and its partners. Some propriety terminologies are included, with permission, and have restrictions on their use (see details). The current version of the NCI Metathesaurus, based on the UMLS build 2016AA, covers up to National Cancer Institute Thesaurus, 16.10e. A viewer for the UMLS changes document can be downloaded from here.
NCI Thesaurus (version: 17.05e)   NCI Thesaurus (NCIt) provides reference terminology for many NCI and other systems. It covers vocabulary for clinical care, translational and basic research, and public information and administrative activities.

NCIt features:
  • Stable, unique codes for biomedical concepts;
  • Preferred terms, synonyms, research codes, external source codes, and other information;
  • Over 100,000 textual definitions;
  • Links to NCI Metathesaurus and other information sources;
  • Over 400,000 cross-links between concepts, providing formal logic-based definition of many concepts;
  • Extensive content integrated from NCI and other partners, much available as separate NCIt subsets
  • Updated frequently by a team of subject matter experts.
NCIt is a widely recognized standard for biomedical coding and reference, used by a broad variety of public and private partners both nationally and internationally including the Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium Terminology (CDISC), the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the Federal Medication Terminologies (FMT), and the National Council for Prescription Drug Programs (NCPDP).
NDF-RT (version: May2017)   National Drug File Reference Terminology (NDF-RT) is produced by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) as an extension of the VHA National Drug File (VANDF) formulary. It organizes the drug list into a formal representation. NDF-RT is used for modeling drug characteristics including ingredients, chemical structure, dose form, physiologic effect, mechanism of action, pharmacokinetics, and related diseases. NDF-RT is part of the Federal Medication Terminologies (FMT), and three components -- Mechanism of Action, Physiologic Effect, and Structural Class - are used in FDA Structured Product Labeling (SPL).
NPO (version: 2011-12-08)   NanoParticle Ontology (NPO) represents knowledge underlying the preparation, chemical composition, physicochemical and functional/biological characterization of nanomaterials such as nanoparticles, nanodevices, and nanostructures, which are formulated and tested for applications in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics.
OBI (version: 2016-10-11)   Ontology for Biomedical Investigations (OBI) is an integrated ontology for the description of biological and clinical investigations. This includes a set of 'universal' terms, applicable across various biological and technological domains, and domain-specific terms relevant only to a single domain. This ontology will support the consistent annotation of biomedical investigations, regardless of the particular field of study. The ontology will represent the design of an investigation, the protocols and instrumentation used, the material used, the data generated and the type analysis performed on it. Currently OBI is being built under the Basic Formal Ontology (BFO).
PDQ (version: 2016_07_31)   Physician Data Query (PDQ) Terminology is part of NCI's comprehensive cancer information database, which contains expert summaries on a wide range of cancer topics, a listing of some 30,000 cancer clinical trials from around the world, a directory of genetics services professionals, the NCI Dictionary of Cancer Terms, and the NCI Drug Dictionary. PDQ Terminology provided much of the initial content for NCI Thesaurus, and the two terminologies have been extensively cross-linked and coordinated in areas of shared concern to support data sharing and interoperability.
PDQ to NCIt Mapping (version: 2016_07_31)   The PDQ to NCIt mapping is extracted from the NCI Metathesaurus (NCIm), and it reflects the mappings created by EVS NCIm editors and available in the NCIm MRMAP.RRF file. This mapping is updated when a new version of PDQ is published in NCIm. The current mapping is based on the source and target terminology versions shown below:

   Source: PDQ (Physician Data Query) 2016_07
   Target: NCIt (NCI Thesaurus) 16.10e

The browser links each mapped concept to that concept's page in the current production version of its terminology.

The Version shows the year followed by the month and reflects the version of NCIm from which the MRMAP.RRF was extracted. The Release Date shows the day that this mapping was approved for publication.
RadLex (version: 3_13_1)   RadLex is an active, curated reference ontology for radiology. It has been developed under the sponsorship of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) with additional support from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) and the National Cancer Institute's cancer Biomedical Informatics Grid (caBIG). Development work has been done by volunteer Subspecialty Lexicon Development Committees composed of representatives from numerous organizations across the radiologic and general physician community.
SNOMEDCT_US to ICD10CM Mapping (version: 20160901)   This mapping is extracted from the SNOMED CT US Edition release files via the UMLS Metathesaurus.

   Source: SNOMEDCT_US (SNOMED CT US Edition)
   Target: ICD-10-CM (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification)

The browser links each mapped concept to that concept's page in the current production version of its terminology (if that concept is present in the current version).

The SNOMED CT US Edition to ICD-10-CM Mapping is extracted from the SNOMED CT US Edition release files.

The Version shows the SNOMED CT US Edition release date from which the data were extracted. The Release Date shows the day that this mapping was approved for publication.
SNOMEDCT_US to ICD10 Mapping (version: 20160901)   This mapping is extracted from the SNOMED CT US Edition release files via the UMLS Metathesaurus.

   Source: SNOMEDCT_US (SNOMED CT US Edition)
   Target: ICD-10 (International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision)

The browser links each mapped concept to that concept's page in the current production version of its terminology (if that concept is present in the current version).

The SNOMED CT US Edition to ICD-10 Mapping is extracted from the SNOMED CT US Edition release files.

The Version shows the SNOMED CT US Edition release date from which the data were extracted. The Release Date shows the day that this mapping was approved for publication.
SNOMED CT (version: 2016_09_01)   SNOMED Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) provides core general terminology for the electronic health record (EHR). Concepts have unique meanings and formal logic-based definitions organized into hierarchies. Each international release includes the core of the terminology (concepts, descriptions, and relationships), together with resources to support the implementation and use of SNOMED CT, including subsets, cross maps to existing classifications and coding schemes, and an extensive set of guidelines. SNOMED CT includes more than 311,000 unique concepts. There are almost 800,000 descriptions in SNOMED CT, including synonyms that can be used to refer to a concept. In addition, there are approximately 1,360,000 links or semantic relationships between the SNOMED CT concepts.
UMLS SemNet (version: 3.2)   UMLS Semantic Network is part of the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM) Unified Medical Language System (UMLS). It contains:
  1. Semantic Types, a set of broad subject categories that provide a consistent categorization of all concepts represented in the UMLS Metathesaurus®, and
  2. Semantic Relations, a set of useful and important relationships that exist between Semantic Types.
Zebrafish (version: November_24_2016)   Zebrafish Model Organism Database (Zebrafish) is an ontology of zebrafish anatomical terms, including many definitions and synonyms. The ontology provides standard terminology for annotating gene expression and phenotypes, thus providing a link between these two types of data commonly used to study gene function. It is produced by the Zebrafish Information Network (ZFIN).